Electric Pool Heating

Swimming pool heat pumps work just like central air conditioning heat pumps, only in reverse. Instead of removing heat from the inside of your home and expelling it to the outside air, a pool heat pump takes heat out of the outside air and transfers it into your pool water. Swimming pool heat pumps can extract useful heat energy in air temperatures as low as 45–50°F, so they are very effective in Florida’s mild climate.

A swimming pool heat pump has three major advantages:

  1. It’s substantially cheaper to operate than a gas heater (see below). The electricity required to run a swimming pool heat pump typically costs only one third as much as propane to deliver the same heat, and only half the cost of natural gas.
  2. Heat pumps deliver heat at night and during cloudy and rainy weather, so they offer more consistent and reliable performance than a solar pool heater, although this performance comes at a cost.
  3. Faster recovery time than a solar pool heater. A typically sized pool heat pump will put heat into a pool at a faster rate than a typically sized solar pool heater, so a pool heat pump may be a better choice when the ability to swim during periodic stretches of mild winter weather is a priority.

However, heat pumps do use electricity and electric rates will continue to rise. So if you have a suitable unshaded area to install a solar pool heating system, we strongly recommend that you consider the first of our three pool heating options.

Find out how much money you can save with our Solar Calculator